Upcoming Fantasy Collection gardens

Imagine being immersed in a strange Surrealist world or exploring a courtyard garden from medieval times...

Gardeners have always been inspired by different forms of fantasy. Eight gardens are to be developed in the Hamilton Gardens’ Fantasy Collection, focusing on different aspects of the arts from the Concept Garden to the elaborate designs in the Tudor Garden inspired by Celtic knot patterns.

Literature has inspired the Mansfield Garden which depicts the setting of Katherine Mansfield’s famous short story The Garden Party. The 18th century design craze for ‘the Orient’ informs the Chinoiserie Garden with its perfume bottle gate and richly decorated pavilion.

Most recently the Picturesque Garden (incorporating the journey within Mozart’s The Magic Flute opera) was opened on 4 November 2019, and the Surrealist Garden is due to open February 2020. Two further gardens are also currently under construction for the Fantasy collection: the Medieval Garden and the Baroque Garden.

Each of these gardens support Hamilton Gardens’ internationally unique concept of telling the story of gardens.

Under development

Surrealist Garden

This garden will include many conventional garden features, however everything will be five times the normal size. The large lawn of this garden will also be suitable for concerts and special events. However what will really set this garden apart are the giant topiary figures that have become known as the ‘Trons’. These mysterious, surrealist figures will range in height from five to eight metres and occasionally, just out of the corner of your eye, you might even see them move...

Medieval Garden

Most European medieval and early renaissance gardens were inspired by a very influential French poem called 'Roman de la Rose'. A 13th century courtyard garden would typically include reference to the poem and various Christian symbols. A high stone wall would enclose a court with fruit trees, turf benches, a collection of herbs, a 'flower mead' and the central fountain. In the far corner, a window provides a glimpse of the contrasting form of the minimalist cloister garden.

Baroque Garden

During the 18th and 19th centuries, European royalty developed dramatic gardens that included elements of theatre set design. These gardens weren’t just used for theatrical events, they provided a setting for important people to dress up in expensive cloths and powdered wigs and be seen. This German or Austrian form would feature a Rococo / Baroque façade, large reflecting pool and two sculptural groups. Of all the gardens this possibly has the most direct association with classical music.